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The Best Museums in Washington D.C.

The Best Museums in Washington D.C.

Ready to get your learn on?

Washington, D.C., is home to dozens of world-class museums featuring interactive exhibits ranging from an authentic Tyrannosaurus Rex skeleton to a historic slave cabin to a complete collection of presidential portraits.

Here’s a guide to the best museums in Washington, D.C. Note that while admission is free to the Smithsonian and other publicly funded institutions, a few of the top attractions are privately owned and charge admission fees.

International Spy Museum

International Spy Museum

Editorial credit: Erik Cox Photography / Shutterstock.com
  • Address: 700 L’Enfant Plaza SW, Washington, D.C. 20024
  • Admission: $22.95 for adults, $14.95 for kids (Children under 6 are free)

The privately-funded, nonprofit museum opened its new location in Southwest Washington, D.C., in May, 2019 and features interactive exhibits and the world’s largest public display of authentic spy tools and gadgets.

Exhibits highlight both U.S. intelligence work, as well as the operations and history of espionage agencies around the world, including those in the Middle East, China and Russia. The rooftop provides some of the best panoramic views of Washington, D.C.

Museum of the Bible

Museum of the Bible

Photo courtesy of Museum of the Bible
  • Address: 300 D St. SW, Washington, D.C. 20024
  • Admission: $19.99 for adults, $9.99 for kids (Children under 6 are free)

This gorgeous contemporary 430,000-square-foot, eight-story museum invites people of all faiths to engage with the Bible through high-tech exhibits and interactive experiences.

The museum was privately financed by Steve and Jackie Green, owners of the arts and crafts store chain Hobby Lobby to house their personal collection of more than 40,000 rare biblical texts and artifacts.

There’s also a state-of-the-art lecture hall, a performing arts theater, a children’s area, restaurants and a rooftop garden with panoramic views of Washington, D.C.

National Air and Space Museum

National Air and Space Museum

  • Address: 600 Independence Ave. SW, Washington, D.C. 20560
  • Admission: Free

The Smithsonian’s most popular museum maintains the world’s largest collection of historic aircraft and spacecraft at two facilities. The flagship building on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., houses many of the icons of flight, including the original 1903 Wright Flyer, Charles Lindbergh’s Spirit of St. Louis, John Glenn’s Friendship 7 spacecraft and the Hubble Space Telescope.

The museum’s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, in Chantilly, VA, houses many more artifacts in an open, hangar-like setting, including a Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird, a Concorde and the sole-surviving Boeing 307 Stratoliner. Both museums feature IMAX films and special programs for all ages.

National Gallery of Art

National Gallery of Art

  • Address: Constitution Ave NW, Washington, D.C. 20565
  • Admission: Free

The world-class art museum displays one of the largest collections of paintings, drawings, prints, photographs, sculpture and decorative arts from the 13th century to the present. Its exhibits span two buildings and include an extensive survey of works of American, British, Italian, Flemish, Spanish, Dutch, French and German art.

The museum’s six-acre sculpture garden is a wonderful place to relax and enjoy the ambiance of the National Mall. During the summer on Friday evenings, jazz musicians entertain a crowd by the reflecting pool. In winter, the fountain is converted to an ice rink for outdoor skating.

National Museum of African American History and Culture

National Museum of African American History and Culture

Editorial credit: Lewis Tse Pui Lung / Shutterstock.com
  • Address: 1400 Constitution Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20560
  • Admission: Free (Advance tickets may be required)

The newest of the Smithsonian museums, this popular attraction features a variety of exhibits and educational programs on topics such as slavery, post-Civil War reconstruction, the Harlem Renaissance and the civil rights movement.

Favorite artifacts include the Harriet Tubman hymn book, a Jim Crow railroad car, Rosa Park’s dress, a slave cabin from the early 1800s, Muhammad Ali’s headgear and more.

National Museum of American History

National Museum of American History

Photo courtesy of the National Museum of American History
  • Address: 1300 Constitution Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20560
  • Admission: Free

With more than 3 million artifacts of American history and culture, the museum covers the nation’s history from the War of Independence to the present day. Favorite exhibits include the Star-Spangled Banner, America on the Move, the First Ladies and Many Voices, One Nation.

Object Project, Wegmans Wonderplace and the Sparks Lab provide hands-on activities that inspire kids.

National Museum of the American Indian

National Museum of the American Indian

  • Address: Independence Ave. SW, Washington, D.C. 20560
  • Admission: Free

The Smithsonian museum showcases Native American objects from ancient pre-Columbian civilizations through the 21st century. Multimedia presentations, live performances and hands-on demonstrations bring Native American culture and history to life.

Dining at the Mitsitam Native Foods Café is highly recommended. The cafe offers indigenous cuisines that change quarterly representing each of the five geographic regions covering the entire Western Hemisphere.

National Museum of Natural History

National Museum of Natural History

  • Address: 10th St. & Constitution Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20560
  • Admission: Free

This family favorite Smithsonian museum maintains of some 145 million natural history specimens and human artifacts. Visitors can get a closeup glimpse of a life-size model of a blue whale, the 45-carat Hope Diamond, live insects and butterflies and more than 274 specimens of mammals. The new dinosaur hall features a Tyrannosaurus Rex skeleton alongside more than 700 specimens.

National Portrait Gallery

National Portrait Gallery

Editorial credit: Matt Smith Photographer / Shutterstock.com
  • Address: 8th St NW & F St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20001
  • Admission: Free

The National Portrait Gallery and the Smithsonian American Art Museum are housed together in a historic landmark building in the Penn Quarter neighborhood. The exhibits tell the story of America through the visual arts and represent one of the most inclusive collections of American art of any museum today. America’s Presidents is the nation’s only complete collection of presidential portraits outside the White House.

The Phillips Collection

The Phillips Collection

Editorial credit: Orhan Cam / Shutterstock.com

  • Address: 1600 21st St NW, Washington, D.C. 20009
  • Admission: Free for permanent collection, $12 for adults for ticketed exhibitions

The Phillips Collection presents one of the world’s most distinguished Impressionist and American Modern art collections in an intimate setting in D.C.’s Dupont Circle neighborhood.

Art lovers enjoy paintings by renowned international artists, including Renoir and Rothko, Bonnard and O’Keeffe, van Gogh, Diebenkorn, Daumier and Lawrence, as well as contemporary artists such as Wolfgang Laib, Whitfield Lovell, Zilia Sánchez and Leo Villareal. The Phillips’s is a private museum, supported primarily by donations.

U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum

U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum

  • Address: 100 Raoul Wallenberg Pl. SW, Washington, D.C. 20024
  • Admission: Free (Timed tickets required between March and August)

This museum tells the story of the Holocaust and is a memorial to the millions who died during the Nazi regime in Germany during World War II. The permanent exhibition presents a narrative history of the murder of 6 million European Jews By Nazi Germany from 1933 through 1945.

The exhibit uses graphic images showing film footage and eyewitness testimonies of Nazi concentration camp survivors. The museum is recommended for visitors 11 years and older.

Published at Mon, 24 Feb 2020 13:02:37 +0000

3 Things to Know About a Notice to Vacate

It’s time to move on.

A notice to vacate is given when a tenant is planning on moving out or if the landlord needs the tenant to move out of a rental property. It’s a written form that specifies the date by which the tenant will be moved out.

1. A notice to vacate can be written by the landlord or the tenant

If a landlord needs a tenant to move out, they may write a notice to vacate to give the tenant a final move-out date. On the other hand, if a tenant is planning to move out, they may write a notice to vacate to the landlord, letting them know the date when the rental property will be empty.

2. A notice to vacate is sometimes known as an “eviction notice”

When a landlord gives the notice to vacate, it’s the same thing as giving an eviction notice. It tells the tenant when they need to be out of the rental property, why they’re receiving an eviction notice and what they need to do before moving out.

3. A notice to vacate should be given at least 30 days in advance.

Whether the landlord or the tenant is giving the notice to vacate, it should be given at least 30 days in advance. Some states have laws that require more time — even 45 or 60 days. So, make sure you check out your state’s laws to find out the legal time period for a notice to vacate.

notice to vacate

The more notice, the better

No matter who is giving the notice to vacate, if you can give more time, it’ll be better for both parties. It will make it easier for the landlord to find a new tenant or for the tenant to find a new place to live.

Additional resources

Published at Mon, 24 Feb 2020 13:00:17 +0000